Effect of obesity on success of renal grafts

Exploring associations between anthropometric indices and graft function in patients receiving renal transplant

Tsirigoti et al., JHND Early View

Background

The aim of the present study was to identify indicators of malnutrition, as obtained by anthropometric measurements, that might be potential predictors of transplant outcomes.

Methods

One hundred and three patients receiving a graft from a living or a deceased donor were included in this prospective study. Body mass index (BMI) based on pretransplant dry body weight, triceps skinfold, mid-arm muscle circumference and corrected mid-arm muscle area were measured. Post-transplant data on delayed graft function (DGF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at discharge were collected until patient discharge.

Results

Delayed graft function developed in 36.9% of the patients. BMI was the only anthropometric variable associated with a higher likelihood of DGF (odds ratio = 1.25, 95% confidence interval = 1.07–1.47) after adjusting for age, gender, donor group, donor age and years of dialysis before transplantation. Obesity was associated with a higher frequency of DGF (83.3% versus 31.1%, = 0.001) compared to normal weight. GFR at discharge was negatively associated with BMI [β = −0.014 (0.005), = 0.004], being overweight [β = −0.151 (0.041), < 0.001] and obesity [β = −0.188 (0.053), = 0.001], after adjusting for age, gender, donor group, donor age and years of dialysis, but was not associated with indices of muscle reserves.

Conclusions

The likelihood of DGF was higher among obese patients, whereas GFR at discharge was negatively associated with being overweight and obesity.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s